Bohemira

Let's see the world from so many color perspective

Why Are They Called Twelve Apostles?

|  Awesome Walkabout Exploring Australian Coastal Lines – Part 1.5

 

A short message from a friend of mine popped in my phone as alarm crowed, confirming my journey that day. Aye! It was bright morning encasing our departure to Great Ocean Road. It has been named as one of world’s most scenic coastal line spanning 243 kilometres along the stunning coastline of south-west Victoria. It took roughly 4 hours drive (mainly depend on road’s condition) from Melbourne to reach that one of the most renown landscape —  you can reach it less than 4 hours though, but I suggest that you better beware of road safety sign along the way –. For those who live in Melbourne, it’d be much easier to take route through Geelong and Princess Highway leading to Colac, then continue to follow Corangamite St./ C155. Please remember that in Australia, you drive on the left-hand side of the road. Miraculous vistas could be joes accompanying ourselves. Wide range of ranches with it’s swinging beige meadow seemed like a golden tides waving at us. Lush eucalyptus rainforest and invigorating farming accosted us along the way. The 12 Apostles are located on the corner of Booringa Rd and Great Ocean Road in Princetown and are a part of Port Campbell National Park. So, please remember that it’s only ONE from MANY OTHER spectacular ocean views along Great Ocean Road.

 

After an approximately 240 km shindig winding drove, we finally found an extensive parking lot and a visitor centre. Yeah,… the visit began at the 12 Apostles Visitor Centre. It had an entrance gate which is not too big. The gate led us to a tunnel which took  people to tourist track, boardwalk and viewing platforms. Waving golden shrubs (sort of Spinifex — I thought –), whiten flower buds, and bottle-greened coppery Xanthorrhoea trees along the track just kept us amused on and on.

 

Information Centre

Information Centre

Sign Board

Sign Board

the Track

the Track

Ira Febriana Sari_Twelve Apostles (20)

The tunnel

in the Middle of Golden Shrubs

in the Middle of Golden Shrubs

Tourist Track

Tourist Track

Because Journey Requires Steps

Because Journey Requires Steps

Boardwalk

Boardwalk

Outstanding

Outstanding

CO** CO**

CO** CO**

 

And after 5-10 minutes walk…Voilaaa!!! We found ourselves aghast by the splendours before our eyes. The turquoise of ocean, azure of sky, and bright sandy amber of the rocks were sharing the same horizon as if they were musicians sharing the same stage while orchestrating musical instruments. There was a 200m extension to the eastern viewing platform which was quite steep, but it’s been said to be one of the best spot to enjoy the scenic seascape.

 

Turquoise and Azure Sharing the Same Horizon

Turquoise and Azure Sharing the Same Horizon

Dashing 12 Apostles

Dashing 12 Apostles

Dashing 12 Apostles (2)

Dashing 12 Apostles (2)

Only 8 Stacks Remain

Only 8 Stacks Remain

Ira Febriana Sari_Twelve Apostles (18)

The Main Cliff and the Collapsed Stack

East Viewpoint

East Viewpoint

At the Edge of the World (East Viewpoint)

At the Edge of the World (East Viewpoint)

YOU MAY FALL...in LOVE

YOU MAY FALL…in LOVE

Bashing Wave

Bashing Wave

 

Just the 3 of us

Just the 3 of us

12 Apostles is the formation of sedimentary limestone stacks off the shore of the Port Campbell National Park with close proximity to each other. Since there were less than 12 stacks, I was wondering why they were named 12 Apostles. So I tried to do some googling and took some picture of the information boards nearby. According to many resources, the stacks  were created by constant erosion of the limestone cliffs of the mainland, worsen with the harsh weather condition and blasting winds of Southern Ocean which gradually eroded the softer limestone, forming caves in the form of arch in the cliffs. The cave eventually collapsed and remaining rock stacks up to 45 metres high — the same process happened to London Arch/London Bridge –.  You can see the diagram from the picture below. From what I read at Port Campbell National Park’s information board, formerly the constellation was known as the Sow and Piglets. Muttonbird Island, near Loch Ard Gorge ( I’ll share it on my next post ) was the Sow, and the surrounding smaller rock stacks were the Piglets. The rocks were collectively renamed to 12 Apostles for tourism purposes and was not individually named after the biblical Apostles. We could also see the two other stacks known as Gog and Magog (which is recognized as Yaʾjūj wa-Maʾjūj in Arabic or Yagug va Magug in Persian) both from Gibson Steps or viewing platform, but they were not considered as part of 12 Apostles though. It’s been said that the 9th stack collapsed in 2005, leaving eight stacks as remnants. It’s been predicted that the formation of new stacks or clusters by erosion will be a continuous yet dynamic natural occurrences.

 

 The SignThe Sign  Information BoardInformation Board

 

Straight Lined Cliff near Gibson Steps

Straight Lined Cliff near Gibson Steps

Gog and Magog (: Arabic= Yaʾjūj wa-Maʾjūj)

Gog and Magog (: Arabic= Yaʾjūj wa-Maʾjūj)

Gog, Magog, Togog, Begog, and Tomblog

Gog, Magog, Togog, Begog, and Tomblog

Dina and Dad Vs. Gog and Magog

Dina and Dad Vs. Gog and Magog

2 Sisters, Gog and Magog

2 Sisters, Gog and Magog

Turquoise vs Creme

Turquoise vs Creme

Empty Chair, NOT an Empty Heart

Empty Chair, NOT an Empty Heart

An overnight stay is recommended for a safe and enjoyable trip, allowing you to explore more on nearby coastal attractions. As the wind was blowing the waves like a girl playing her fingers through her hairs, we routed to other spots  of natural wonders along Great Ocean Road.

See ya soon on my next post….

 

__Ira Febriana Sari__

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